Category Archives: Uncategorized

Checking for Understanding

In 2009, John Hattie published the book ‘Visible Learning’. It was the culmination of 15 years of research into what works in education based on over 800 meta-analyse of 50,000 research articles and about 240 million students. The impact of each intervention or … Continue reading

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The value of Knowledge Organizers for GCSE History

Set out below are ‘Knowledge Organizers’ for the IGCSE History course that I teach at my current school. The idea of creating knowledge organizers came from Joe Kirby, who outlines his rationale here. In short, they should contain absolutely essential facts … Continue reading

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ResearchEd New York April 2015

ResearchEd programme  1. Research informed curriculum design by Mary Whitehouse Click to hear audio of the session part 1 & part 2 2.  Transforming research into best practice for literacy design by Dr Diana Sisson and Dr Betsy Sisson Click here … Continue reading

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Designing a Year 7 history curriculum with memory rather than levels in mind

Admittedly, I am coming to this assessment issue late, but I think I was subconsciously hoping something would magically appear. However, it hasn’t, so I am need to put some serious thought into developing an assessment approach for the KS3 … Continue reading

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Summer Reading for teachers

           

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FRaDing: a case for not marking regularly

Assessment marking orthodoxy is that books should be looked at once every two weeks. There are obviously legitimate reasons for doing this: when students work hard on a piece of work we need to show we value that and offer … Continue reading

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The principles of effective feedback

There is now a wealth of evidence that feedback can have a huge effect on learning quality. In fact the Education Endowment Foundation states that on average feedback can add 8 months additional progress in one year. Hattie gives feedback an average … Continue reading

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